Category Archives: Today’s World

Mountainfilm Festival & A Little Niceness

Billowy clouds move across the snow covered San Juan Mountains, making for a beautiful backdrop for the 2017 Mountainfilm Festival and a great reminder of the power of nature to inspire people to action. Telluride, Colo., May 2017. Photo: Francesca Rehnborg
Billowy clouds move across the snow covered San Juan Mountains, making for a beautiful backdrop for the 2017 Mountainfilm Festival and a great reminder of the power of nature to inspire people to action. Telluride, Colo., May 2017. Photo: Francesca Rehnborg

Francesca and I are back from the Mountainfilm Festival in Telluride, Colorado. Each year, this festival focuses on themes that inspire people through the power of film, art and ideas to take action to create a better world, so we attend whenever we can. This year was extra special, complete with one of those proud moments that parents treasure. During the festival, our daughter Koral and her band mates performed at O’Bannon’s, a local Irish pub. We had a wonderful time as the band’s Reggae-inspired music filled the air with an uplifting message of living sustainably. Of all our kids, Koral is the most like my father with her out-of-the box thinking, endless creativity and respect for the planet. Continue reading Mountainfilm Festival & A Little Niceness

What’s Up Now?

Sitting next to a life-size statue of my father Carl F. Rehnborg, it’s easy to see why it’s a favorite photo stop for visitors at the Nutrilite Health Institute. The statue was inspired by his famous “pepper tree talks" and his many conversations filled with visionary ideas. Buena Park, California. March 2017.
Sitting next to a life-size statue of my father Carl F. Rehnborg, it’s easy to see why it’s a favorite photo stop for visitors at the Nutrilite Health Institute. The statue was inspired by his famous “pepper tree talks” and his many conversations filled with visionary ideas. Buena Park, California. March 2017.

It is hard to believe that six months have passed since I returned home from my Double X sailing trip. If you’ve been following my blog, you know it certainly wasn’t the trip we expected, especially with El Nino testing the mettle of both boat and crew. Now that I have settled into life back home, I’m more inspired than ever to focus on two of my passions: optimal health and sustainable living. Continue reading What’s Up Now?

Coral Reefs, Then & Now

A Firebird crew member holds a delicate coral inadvertently broken off by our anchor chain during our passage from Bali, Indonesia, to the Cocos [Keeling] Islands, January 1977. With today’s warmer, more acidic ocean waters in the South Seas, it’s been difficult to spot vibrant coral like this during the Double X journey.
A Firebird crew member holds a delicate coral inadvertently broken off by our anchor chain during our passage from Bali, Indonesia, to the Cocos [Keeling] Islands, January 1977. With today’s warmer, more acidic ocean waters in the South Seas, it’s been difficult to spot vibrant coral like this during the Double X journey.
We certainly had a grand time on Tahaa and Raiatea visiting with friends and touring the islands. Of course, I was also eager to learn as much as I could about the local impact of warmer and acidic water conditions. It didn’t take long to come face-to-face with one of the most significant challenges that the islands face today: dying coral reefs. Continue reading Coral Reefs, Then & Now

A Friendly Welcome on Raiatea

Francesca and other guests celebrate the birthday of our friend Frendoo (not featured). In the background, Double X crew member Paul happily shares a friendly “hang loose” sign. Raiatea, October 2016.
Francesca and other guests celebrate the birthday of our friend Frendoo (not featured). In the background, Double X crew member Paul happily shares a friendly “hang loose” sign. Raiatea, October 2016.

I wrote about the wonderful time Francesca and I had on Tahaa in my last post. Our next stop was Raiatea, a sister island to Tahaa. Both islands are enclosed by a single coral reef and, at one time, may have been one island. When we arrived, we were welcomed with open arms by Frendoo, the daughter of one my father’s friends, and her husband Roland. The last time I saw Frendoo she was 14 years old. On this visit, she was celebrating her 61st birthday, and Francesca and I were excited to be able to join in the celebration. Continue reading A Friendly Welcome on Raiatea

Bora Bora and Beyond

Two happy children of Tahiti. September 2016
Two happy children of Tahiti. September 2016

Our sailing itinerary has changed yet again thanks to weather that has gone from dicey to downright unsafe. We had to give up on venturing out to relatively uninhabited areas where I was looking forward to exploring the land and talking with the islanders about what was happening in their corner of the world. Weather conditions dictated that we stick to the beaten path, so we passed on visiting more isolated atolls in the Tuamotus and set a course for the Society Islands. Our first stop: Bora Bora. Continue reading Bora Bora and Beyond

Fishing the Sustainable Way

An assortment of fresh fish at a local outdoor market. Fishing is a top income producer in French Polynesia, just below tourism and pearl farming. Rangiroa, Tuomotu Islands. September 2016. Photo: F. Rehnborg
An assortment of fresh fish at a local outdoor market. Fishing is a top income producer in French Polynesia, just below tourism and pearl farming. Rangiroa, Tuamotu Islands. September 2016. Photo: F. Rehnborg

On August 22nd, we bid farewell to the Marquesas, setting a course from Fatu Hiva to Fakarava and then on to Rangiroa, the two largest atolls in the Tuamotus. It’s a three-day sail, about 600 miles, between the two island groups. Where the soaring volcanic mountains of the Marquesas rise to over 4,000 feet, the Tuamotu atolls are just above sea level. Yet these very different island groups are at the center of a singular global challenge: sustainable fishing. Continue reading Fishing the Sustainable Way

Marquesas Islands: Then & Now

A Marquesan home tucked among the craggy rocky formations and vibrant foliage. Fatu Hiva, Marquesas Islands. August 2016. Photo: F. Rehnborg
A Marquesan home tucked among the craggy rocky formations and vibrant foliage. Fatu Hiva, Marquesas Islands. August 2016. Photo: F. Rehnborg

The first time I visited the Marquesas Islands was 41 years ago on board the Firebird. I was a young man ready for adventure and, after reading Herman Melville’s Typee and Thor Heyerdahl’s Fatu-Hiva: Back to Nature, I was captivated by the islands I imagined, and I was eager to visit. When we arrived at Nuku Hiva, the first of the islands we visited, I was awe-struck by the land’s beauty. I couldn’t take enough photos. Continue reading Marquesas Islands: Then & Now